“Milk” – Chris Letcher

“Milk” is an immediately engaging rocker with stronger ties to something resembling late classic rock—Peter Gabriel comes to mind, or early Michael Penn—than what we are used to hearing in our indie-rock-centric new century. Consider it a good thing. On the one hand, wholesale rejection of the past is a tiresome (not to mention lazy) artistic premise. On the other hand, diversity sustains us. And I’m talking honest diversity, not lip-service diversity, not photo-op diversity, and not (for heaven’s sake) diversity minus substance and qualification (any resemblance to a certain unexpected political announcement from the past week is entirely intentional).

But I digress. Chris Letcher—hey, yet another Fingertips veteran; three for three this week, for the first time—is a South African-born, London-based singer/songwriter whose experience, likewise, as a film composer no doubt informs his capacity to construct dramatic and unusual soundscapes, even in the context of a three-minute pop song. Through the judicious use of strings, percussion, and Letcher’s signature harmonium, “Milk” maintains an orchestral feeling even as it moves with a brisk, rock-like clarity which highlights the melody’s succinct tension. This version of “Milk” is a so-called “radio edit” of a song that appeared on Letcher’s Deep Frieze CD; it appears on his Harmonium EP, which was released earlier this summer on Sheer Sound/2 Feet label.




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