“The Way to Canaan” – The King Left

Okay so noise is one thing. When you come right down to it, it’s easy to make noise. Never understood what the fuss was about from the rock’n’roll primitivists who glorify sheer volume. I mean, okay–turn the bloody amps up and boom. It’s noisy. Like, wow.

Start combining noise with discipline and you begin to get my attention. Start understanding music enough to create different kinds of noise, not all of which are simply loud, and now you’ve really got something going. The King Left certainly does, playing continually along the edge of dissonance in this sharp, rumbling rocker. From the outset, we get no settled sense of tonic, a base chord to call home; instead we get slashing, clanging guitars and–key to keeping things unsettled–a dynamic bass line, running up and down and all around. The sound is at once harsh and tight. And listen to where the music goes when the lyrical line ends, at 0:27, and again at 0:40–we’re left not only without resolution but bopping itchily in a clashing key, with that bass guitar refusing to ground us in a stable place. The chorus at long last delivers an anthemic release, but–there’s a catch–buries it under a searing lead guitar, while Corey Oliver, even as he all but shouts, delivers his vocals as if now down in the basement. Nothing is easy but the hand-hold here is that it’s all very precise. Knowing you’re in good hands relaxes the ear, I think.

The band’s MySpace page lists Radiohead, The Beatles, David Bowie, Talking Heads, Nirvana, and R.E.M. as its first five influences and damned if “The Way to Canaan” isn’t some kind of crazy-brilliant amalgam of all five. The song is from the New York City quartet’s first full-length album–which is unfortunately also their last. They played their final show last week and are now no more. MP3 via the band’s site. Thanks to Largehearted Boy for the head’s up.




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